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Illinois lawmakers push for rural school broadband

SENATE DEMOCRATS ARE INTRODUCING LEGISLATION TO HELP BRING HIGH SPEED INTERNET TO MORE STUDENTS IN RURAL AREAS. >>>
SENATOR ANDY MANAR OF BUNKER HILL SAYS NEARLY 90 THOUSAND STUDENTS AT ABOUT 100 RURAL SCHOOLS DON’T HAVE ACCESS TO HIGH SPEED INTERNET.

“Many students can’t do what so many others take for granted...stream educational videos, participate in online testing, play games. It brings opportunity to all children when it comes to learning, “ Manar said.

MANAR SAYS HIS BILL CALLS FOR BROADBAND INFRASTRUCTURE TO BE PUT IN AT THESE SCHOOLS. THE PROJECT WOULD BE A ONE-TIME EXPENSE AND PAID FOR WITH 16 MILLION IN STATE FUNDS AND BY LEVERAGING FEDERAL MATCHING DOLLARS.

THE BILL CALLS FOR BROADBAND INFRASTRUCTURE TO BE PUT IN AT RURAL SCHOOLS IN ILLINOIS. THE PROJECT WOULD BE A ONE-TIME EXPENSE OF 16 MILLION DOLLARS TO THE STATE, WITH FEDERAL MATCHING FUNDS PICKING UP THE REST OF THE TAB. IT’S SUPPORTED BY SENATOR JENNIFER BERTINO-TARRANT OF PLAINFIELD.

“Without broadband, students lack that opportunity and access for quality education just because of geographic location,” according to Bertino-Tarrant.

BILL SPONSORS SAYS NEARLY 90 THOUSAND STUDENTS IN ABOUT 100 RURAL SCHOOLS IN ILLINOIS DO NOT HAVE ACCESS TO HIGH SPEED INTERNET. {IRN}

94.1 WGFA

  • Parent Category: News

Purdue research hub to transform freeze-drying process used to make lifesaving drugs, preserve food

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Purdue University researchers and industry leaders are teaming up to transform the freeze-drying process, formally known as lyophilization, used to make everything from lifesaving drugs and biotech products to foods.

A consortium of researchers, industry members from pharmaceutical and food processing sectors, as well as equipment makers and others, are working together at the Advanced Lyophilization Technology Hub, or LyoHub, at Purdue to modernize a process that has not changed fundamentally in 70 years even though it has a worldwide annual market of about $16 billion.

Read more: Purdue research hub to transform freeze-drying process used to make lifesaving drugs, preserve food

  • Parent Category: News

Hoopeston Police arrest 2 on drug charges

A burglary investigation led to drug charges against two men in Hoopeston Wednesday.  22-year-old Colton Simon and 21 year-old Crhis Staats were charged with the residential burglary on S. 5th Street.  BNoth are also facing charges of posssesion of cannabis and posession of a controlled substance with intent o deliver.

94.1 WGFA

  • Parent Category: News

K3 Council rejects police chief, Dumas, again

A special meeting of the Kankakee City Council (Tuesday) again resulted in the council members voting No for the appointment of Price Dumas as police chief.

It’s the third time since June the council has rejected the appointment made by Mayor Chastity Wells-Armstrong. The mayor immediately re-appointed Dumas on an interim basis.
Alderman David Crawford is now threatening to take the matter to court.

The council vote was 8-6 against. Two other earlier votes also had the council denying the mayor’s appointment.

Dumas has served as police chief since June 2nd. He was with the Illinois State Police. On two occasions — June 19 and Aug. 21 — Dumas’ name was up for vote to have the interim tag removed from his title. On both votes, his appointment failed to gain the needed majority on the 14-member city council. The June vote brought a 10-4 rejection. The gap closed in August, as Dumas was rejected by an 8-6 vote.

Alderman Crawford said the Dumas matter has been extended long enough. He said it’s time to conclude the issue by either voting in favor or removing him from the post.

Aldermen have said he’s not qualified for the administrative position of chief. The mayor counters saying, she’s perfectly satisfied and says Dumas has done a good job.

Crawford has said he believes the majority of the council wants a thorough search for the department's next chief.
Crawford stressed this is not about Dumas being African-American. In fact, many council members who have opposed Dumas believe the city should have a black police chief, he said.

Wells-Armstrong said Dumas has performed well as chief and there simply is no need to expend resources for a search. The cost of a search has been estimated to be in the $12,000 to $15,000 range.

94.1 WGFA