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No surgical or N95 mask? Wear DIY face cover during coronavirus outbreak: CDC
Powerofflowers/iStock (NEW YORK) -- The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is advising the use of cloth face coverings during the novel coronavirus pandemic, even do-it-yourself covers. The CDC said cloth face masks are also important to use by those not exhibiting symptoms. "The virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity -- for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing -- even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms." according to a statement on the CDC’s website. "In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to...
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'If they lose me to COVID’: Doctor’s tweet to her children resonates with parents
4X-image/iStock (NEW YORK) -- A doctor who is on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic in New York City has captured viral attention with a message she shared on Twitter to her two children.Dr. Cornelia Griggs, a 36-year-old pediatric surgeon and mother of Eloise, 4, and Jonah, 1, tweeted a photo of herself in full personal protective equipment on March 29 writing, “My babies are too young to read this now. And they’d barely recognize me in my gear. But if they lose me to COVID I want them to know Mommy tried really hard to do her job. #GetMePPE...
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US faces shortage of drugs that could be possible treatments for coronavirus: FDA
BartekSzewczyk/iStock (NEW YORK) -- Barbi Manchester has lived with Lupus for 13 years and has taken hydroxychloroquine to treat it for just as long.But last month, for the first time since being prescribed the medication, she had trouble getting her prescription filled."I've never had any issues," said Manchester, a Lupus Foundation of America advocate and ambassador.After reaching out to multiple pharmacies, Manchester eventually found one that she said had a limited supply.The Federal Drug Administration on Tuesday said the country is now facing a shortage of the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, noting "a significant surge in demand." This comes after...
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Should pulse oximeters be used at home to track coronavirus symptoms?
microgen/iStock (NEW YORK) -- Lung problems like pneumonia and respiratory failure can be some of the most severe symptoms of COVID-19. Knowing how your lungs are doing could help calm a lot of nerves. Advice found on YouTube and social media is gaining traction, turning some toward the use of a pulse oximeter to monitor their oxygen levels at home.For people who already have the pocket-sized device at home due to an underlying health condition, it's fine to continue using it -- but doctors say for most people it’s not needed, and may even be a bad idea.A pulse oximeter,...
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Hospital calling for donors to help with experimental, 'promising' COVID-19 treatment
Dr. Kyle Annen, with Children's Hospital Colorado. (ABC News) (NEW YORK) -- Doctors at Children's Hospital Colorado hoping to save lives amid a global pandemic are calling on people who have already recovered from COVID-19 to donate their plasma, part of an experimental treatment to help patients who are still sick."People who have recovered from coronavirus have a ton of antibodies," said Dr. Kyle Annen, medical director at the Children's Blood Donor Center. "So what we're doing is we're taking the plasma from the people that are just recovered from coronavirus but no longer have the virus, and then transfusing...
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People and pets help each other through coronavirus pandemic
Brendan von Wahl/iStock (NEW YORK) -- Walking the dog has been a popular diversion for many enduring coronavirus quarantine, with pets playing an important role in helping humans get through this difficult time. Shelter-in-place orders around the country have even created a surge in demand for pets to provide both companionship and comfort."There is now a huge interest in fostering dogs and cats," said Tracy Elliott, president of the Chicago Anti-Cruelty Society. "We have hundreds and hundreds of people waiting." Elliott said the society also experienced a run on adoptions before it had to close its buildings.Elliott points to the...
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Burn survivor creates nonprofit to inspire and empower others like her
Courtesy Andrea Pitts (NEW YORK) -- Scars scattered across Andrea Pitts' body may be physical signs of her traumatic experience as an infant, however, for Pitts and for so many burn survivors, emotional scars also linger."One day I was looking for something to wear in the closet," Pitts explained to ABC News' Good Morning America, "and I was going through all these different clothes I didn't want to wear them because I didn't want to show my scars."This closet-searching moment would become a soul-searching moment for Pitts, who said embracing her scars has been a lifelong process.At just 18 months...
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In COVID-19 crisis, patients are left waiting as hospitals put major surgeries on hold
Zach Branson (WHITEWATER, Colo.) -- Zach Branson was born with a rare liver disease. Doctors recently told Branson, a 33-year-old living in Whitewater, Colorado, that he wouldn’t survive much longer without a liver transplant. In a stroke of good luck, his uncle volunteered to be a living donor.“Everything was finalized,” Branson said. “His liver was a great matchup for me.”But in March, as the COVID-19 pandemic swept the country, Branson’s doctors postponed the transplant.“I should essentially be in transplant surgery right now, but I'm currently not because of the pandemic that's going on,” Branson told ABC News on March 25.Doctors...
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FDA loosens restrictions on gay and bisexual men, encourages blood donations amid coronavirus crisis
SDI Productions/iStock (WASHINGTON) -- The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said it would loosen some of the restrictions that have blocked gay men from donating blood.The agency is changing the recommended deferral period from 12 months to three months."LGBTQ Americans can hold their heads up today and know that our voices will always triumph over discrimination," GLAAD President and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis said in a statement. "This is a victory for all of us who raised our collective voices against the discriminatory ban on gay and bisexual men donating blood. The FDA’s decision to lower the deferral period...
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'There are a lot of struggles': Recovering addicts say coronavirus creates new challenge to stay sober
iStock/Prostock-Studio (CHICAGO) -- On a normal Thursday night, 29-year-old Chris Reed and more than 100 recovering alcohol and drug addicts like himself would be filling The Other Side sober bar he opened in northern Illinois to listen to live music, socialize and lean on each other in their daily struggles to keep from relapsing.But since the coronavirus has swept the globe killing more than 50,000 people, including more than 5,000 in the United States, Reed's sober tavern in Crystal Lake has been shuttered by social distancing rules and all-important physical peer-to-peer meetings for people in recovery have switched to online...
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Disaster in motion: 3.4 million travelers poured into US as coronavirus pandemic erupted
AlxeyPnferov/iStock (NEW YORK) -- An ABC News investigation offers sobering insight into how COVID-19 has spread and penetrated so broadly, so deeply and so quickly in the United States. It also helps explain why Americans, no matter where they live, must continue to heed the warnings of health officials to self distance and why the virus likely was here far earlier than first realized.With the advent of COVID-19, the world has officially entered a dangerous new phase where a surge in international travel in recent decades served as the springboard -- jet fuel, really -- for an infectious disease potentially...
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NYC surgeon who survived Ebola responds to Trump suggesting supplies are being stolen from city hospitals
New York City surgeon Dr. Craig Spencer discusses his concerns about COVID-19 outbreak on "The View," April 2, 2020. - (ABC) (NEW YORK) -- A surgeon who was the first person in New York City to be diagnosed with the Ebola virus in 2014 rejected President Donald Trump's claim that masks and other protective equipment intended for use in New York hospitals to fight the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, might have been stolen.Dr. Craig Spencer, the director of global health and emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center is on the frontline of the COVID-19 fight in New York City, which...
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