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Health News

A real-life 'Limitless' pill? Silicon Valley entrepreneurs pursue brain hacking with nootropics, or 'smart drugs'
luchschen/iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- From late nights out to early mornings on the job, 30-year-old entrepreneur Erin Finnegan says she has a secret boost that keeps her going.She uses “nootropics,” also called “smart drugs,” or supplements claiming to boost brain function, helping to improve memory, focus and maybe even make you brilliant.“I’m bicoastal, I’m in New York and I’m here [in Los Angeles], and a lot of times traveling,” Finnegan said.Much like how actor Bradley Cooper played a character who took a pill and his focus went from zero to 100 in the movie “Limitless,” there are some saying the...
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Boy with deadly disease competes in triathlons to stay healthy
Courtesy Josue and Maruska Vella (NEW YORK) -- Jake Vella is literally running for his life. The 7-year-old Maltese boy suffers from an extremely rare life-threatening disease that causes him to gain weight despite his healthy diet and vigorous exercise regime. Less than 100 people in the world have ever been diagnosed with the illness called ROHHAD, which affects the automatic nervous system and endocrine system.But Jake is no ordinary kid. To help combat the disease he competes in triathlons like his father and follows a strict diet.“Triathlons help Jake to keep fit and active. It’s good for his health...
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Robot allows 6-year-old to attend kindergarten while she fights cancer
Courtesy Michelle Adkins (ROBINSON, Texas) -- One kindergartner undergoing cancer treatment is able to "attend" class, thanks to the help of artificial intelligence.In January, PJ Trojanowski, 6, was diagnosed with the kidney cancer Wilms tumor in both kidneys."She's our most outgoing child," dad Eric Trojanowski told ABC News Wednesday. "It was a different thing to sit down and tell my 6-ear-old, 'You have cancer and the doctors have to figure out how to get it out of you. She was feisty about it. The doc even said, 'I don't know Paisley very well, but I know kids like her do...
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Premature deaths rise in US as opioid epidemic worsens, report finds
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Premature deaths of people under age 75 are increasing at a dramatic rate across the U.S., according to a new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.The authors of the foundation's annual report from its County Health Rankings and Roadmaps program noted a dramatic uptick in premature deaths in the U.S. due largely to "unintentional injuries," which include accidental drug overdoses and car crashes.They found that in 2015, 1.2 million people in the U.S. died prematurely or before the age of 75 from causes considered preventable. This is an increase of nearly 40,000 from the previous...
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Gov. Chris Christie to work with Jared Kushner to combat opioid epidemic
ABC News (Chris Christie denies rift with Jared Kushner, says pair 'get along just great'(WASHINGTON) — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie denied there was tension between him and Jared Kushner, a senior adviser to President Donald Trump, as the two prepare to team up in a new White House initiative to combat the nation's opioid epidemic, saying on Good Morning America Wednesday that they "get along just great."When he was the U.S. attorney of New Jersey, Christie prosecuted Kushner's father, real estate mogul Charles Kushner, who was sentenced to prison in 2005 on 18 counts of tax evasion, witness tampering...
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Photo shoots capture experiences of families of terminally ill children
ABC News (RICHMOND, Va.) — For parents of terminally ill children, professional photographs aren't typically at the top of the priority list.But the Tiny Sparrow Foundation, an organization that matches professional photographers with these families free of charge, says the parents they serve are often "incredibly appreciative and grateful for the memories."ABC News traveled to Richmond, Virginia, to document a Tiny Sparrow photo shoot with the Cummings family. Veronica Cummings, 10, was born with a genetic condition called Trisomy 13."All I remember was, when I looked up, his face had turned white," mother Christina Cummings said about her husband, Ronnie,...
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Chris Christie joining Trump effort to combat opioids
Drew Angerer/Getty Images (WASHINGTON) -- New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is set to play a role in a new White House effort to tackle the nation’s opioid epidemic, a White House official confirms to ABC News.Christie was a central figure in President Trump's campaign and was the first to lead his transition team, but he was replaced with Vice President Mike Pence just days after the election.He was also passed over for high-profile positions in Trump's administration, such as attorney general.Politico has reported on the details of a draft order, not yet obtained by ABC News, which calls for the...
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How President Trump's 'Energy Independence' executive order will impact the Clean Power Plan
iStock/Thinkstock (WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump signed on Tuesday the "Energy Independence" executive order, requiring the review of a regulation unpopular in coal country states where he was wildly popular on election day. The order also unravels former President Barack Obama's goal of tackling climate change."Today I'm taking bold action on that promise," Trump said at the signing of the executive order at the Environmental Protection Agency. "My administration is putting an end to the war on coal. We're going to have clean coal, really clean coal."EPA chief Scott Pruitt said on "This Week" this past weekend, "This is about...
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Brain implants helps paralyzed man drink coffee on his own for 1st time in years
Case Western Reserve University (CLEVELAND) -- After years of paralysis, a man was able to pick up a cup of coffee and take a sip, thanks to experimental technology that allowed brain signals to control his arm with the help of a computer.The researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center documented their work in a new study published Tuesday in The Lancet medical journal. The study explains how a special electrical device, including implants in the brain and arm, allowed the man to control the movement of his right hand and arm years after being...
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Teen brings little girl's mermaid dream to life
Keegan Carnahan/Twitter: @selftltledtyler (TAMPA, Fla.) -- One little girl’s magical mermaid dreams of being “Under the Sea” came true during bath time last week.Keegan Carnahan, a teen from Tampa, Florida, was helping give her nanny’s daughter a bath while the nanny, Jenna Haslam, was busy making dinner.Haslam’s daughter, 3-year-old Alidy Clark, thought Carnahan looked like a real-life mermaid because of her dyed pink hair, so the teen decided to take it one step further by putting on a waterproof mermaid tail she had in her closet.The timing worked out perfectly because Haslam had just ordered Alidy a children’s mermaid tail...
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The workout secrets of a trucker fitness guru
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- A former Olympic hopeful-turned-truck driver has released a book on how to stay fit and lose weight even if you have a largely sedentary lifestyle.Siphiwe Baleka is attempting to revolutionize the trucking industry, which has often been called one of the country's unhealthiest industries.The fitness guru and long-haul trucker shared tips from his new book, 4-Minute Fit: The Metabolism Accelerator for the Time Crunched, Deskbound, and Stressed Out, live on ABC News' Good Morning America Tuesday.Baleka, a former NCAA Division I athlete at Yale University who failed to qualify for the 1992 U.S. Olympic swimming trials...
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Reporter's notebook: What I learned about my body after being in a metabolic chamber
ABC News/Mara Schiavocampo By MARA SCHIAVOCAMPO ABC News' Mara Schiavocampo shared her experiences after spending a day inside a metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City. Schiavocampo's journey, which aired on "Good Morning America," was the first time that TV cameras were allowed to peek into a metabolic chamber, which is used to monitor your total energy expenditure and better understand how your body uses energy in everyday tasks such as resting, eating and exercising.Three weeks ago I spent an entire day inside a vacuum-sealed metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New...
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